AndroidBlogsiOSNews

Report: Some Mobile Games Listen To What You Watch on TV

Alphonso's software seeks to deliver more appropriate advertising.

Mobile Games

Smartphones have become key to the lives of many since they are tools that allow us to communicate, organize and have fun. Unfortunately, the importance of these devices has also made them the ideal tool to spy on us. As proof of this, we have the fact that some mobile games – even some intended for an audience of children’s – use technology to spy on their users.

According to a recent report by The New York Times, applications such as Honey Quest, Beer Pong, and mobile games like Pool 3D and Real Bowling Strikes 10 Pin, use software from Alphonso, a company that obtains useful data for advertisers. What the program of this company does is “use the microphone of mobile devices to detect TV commercials and content to show appropriate mobile ads”.

For example, if you install one of the 250 applications that use Alphonso’s software and open it (even if it’s in the background) while watching a football game, your smart device will detect the ones you’re watching and the commercials that appear. After this happens, it is likely that on the app will appear ads related to sports, teams that participated in the game or snacks.

Ashish Chordia, founder and CEO of Alphonso, defended his software by ensuring that he does not record conversations between humans. In addition, he pointed out that the applications that use it can only access the microphone and the location of the users that give them permission to do so.

That said, there are several people who have been annoyed with this type of practice, especially because it is not clear what they hear and what they do not. Also, many fear that with the passage of time this type of practices become more intrusive and problematic.

Recall that in the middle of this year, a group of people sued Disney after accusing it of spying on minors through their applications. According to the accusers, games such as Disney Princess Palace Pets and Where’s My Water 2 present codes that allow you to filter information from smart devices to present more relevant ads for its users.

What do you think about the existence of software like Alphonso’s? How should players fight against this type of application? Tell us in the comments below.

Rajesh V
the authorRajesh V
Editor of GameTransfers.com and video game enthusiast.