Nintendo Is Investigated In The US for Alleged Switch Patent Infringement

Gamevice seeks to stop the import of the console to the country.

Gamevice

The ideas that some creatives or teams of creatives have in companies usually become patent, whether they are concrete or not. This situation has caused that, in many cases, legal controversies arise when a creation is successful and someone patented a similar idea or what is considered part of the original idea. In that sense, a report revealed that Nintendo is in the sights of the United States International Trade Commission (USITC) for an alleged violation of patents.

According to a report by Engadget, Nintendo is investigated by the USITC after the Gamevice company initiated the relevant process, considering that the Switch hybrid console violates its patent related to accessories that fulfill control functions and that are inserted on both sides of a portable device, such as a smartphone or tablet.

The company, which appeals to principles contained in the Tariff Act of 1930, which protects the North American market against imports, seeks to stop Nintendo from manufacturing the Joy-Con controls, which could stop the import of Switch to the US.

Regarding this situation, the USITC informed that it has already begun the investigations and after 45 days it will determine whether Gamevice’s complaint against Nintendo is applicable and referred to the description of the accessories in question: “The products at issue in the investigation are controller systems with parts that attach to two sides of an electronic device, such as a smartphone or tablet, and the parts fit into a user’s hands and have gaming controls.”

This type of situations is not alien to Nintendo, as the Japanese company has been involved in similar problems in which it has emerged victorious, but has also suffered a setback. An example of this was the case it lost in 2013 when it was sued for violating an autostereoscopic patent that was used in 3DS without the creator’s consent and the trial it lost last year for violating patents related to the Wii Remote.